The reality of modern-day motherhood means we are often filling our days with a myriad of responsibilities and have a tendency to prioritise ourselves last. More often than not, it isn’t until we reach burn out that we decide to practice some form of self-care. However societal depictions of self-care often include getting our hair done or going for a massage – singular events that not always reflect the deep need for our mind, body and soul but instead are depictions of what we think we “should” do.

I support a different model of self-care. One that carves out time within our everyday lives and instead of being a once-a-month activity, it is simply a way of being in this world. Conscious and connected to nourishing the needs of our whole selves.

  • LISTEN TO YOUR BODY

We tend to lead our lives operating on auto pilot and concerned about completing to-do lists (which, by the way, will never end). Instead I encourage you to pause and tune in. Meditation is a deeply powerful way to do this, but even the simple act of closing our eyes, turning inward and listening allows us to connect to our needs witin any given moment. Do you really feel like that social outing today? Is my body thirsty? How am I feeling right now?

  • CONNECTION TO PURPOSE

The ability to connect with the world and purpose outside of ourselves is deeply powerful. This supports us to lead a life in line with our values, leaving us feeling fulfilled. For some people, this may include religious practice, for others it means intention setting or connecting with nature. Simply being in nature has a way of reminding us that that world is so much bigger than us. It may also include learning, extending intellectual knowledge and challenging our minds. Whatever this looks like for you, I encourage you to find time and ways to consciously take note of what is important or lights you up.

  • CREATING SPACIOUSNESS OF MIND

Spaciousness of mind is the ultimate outcome for all mindfulness practices. It gives us the skill set to pause before reacting and the ability to seek calm despite chaos. The process of doing so is two-fold. We first need to bring awareness to our triggers and thoughts. The very act of doing so is an act of caring for self which is why this concept is key to our Mindful Together Project. We then seek out ways to manage these automatic thoughts and trigger patterns – which could include meditation, journaling or expressive modalities such as art or writing.

  • HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Saying no is a form of self care. Setting boundaries to priortise and protect ourselves is important. In order to do so we need to be connected to self and listening to our body and mind. This may include limiting contact with those who lower our vibration or cancelling a social event when we know we need time alone instead. Depending on your extrovert or introvert tendancies also, social self care will look different for everyone. Ackowledge whether you are someone who needs time alone to recharge or time with others to feel energised.

  • SENSORY SELF CARE

We are constantly receiving a myriad of sensory inputs which is often happening outside of our consciousness. Processing and integrating all of this sensory information can be overwhelming to our system but we can also use sources of sensory input as a from of care for self. This may include diffusing certain scents in your home, decluttering surfaces, changing our bed sheets or playing certain music. We can curate a sensory environement in our home that supports calm or supports chaos.